Looking After the Long Term

Last night in Karori, the Wellington Central electorate had one of its first public meetings of the campaign period.

Sue Kedgley MC'ing

Sue Kedgley MC'ing


Outgoing MP Sue Kedgley, who has stood in Wellington Central for four consecutive terms of Parliament, hosted new Candidate James Shaw and sitting MP Dr Kennedy Graham, from Christchurch, for an evening of presentations and discussion about sustainable options for our economy, a smart green economic plan which has been rolling out in stages over the past couple of months.

Dr Kennedy Graham in mid-flight

Dr Kennedy Graham in mid-flight


Dr Graham spoke first, detailing the development of global policy initiatives developed during his time with UNDP – from the 1992 Rio Summit on Climate Change forwards, he has been in the vanguard of those trying to quantify, and provide a matrix of solutions for, a range of climate issues. He was our Green MP at Copenhagen 2010, and gave a sobering presentation on the changes that have occurred since that first conference in 1992. The win over ozone depletion of atmosphere was the best outcome of those years, but we have lost biodiversity, and seen global CO2 emissions rise far outside the protocols first discussed, then reviewed at each subsequent Climate Conference. The time is now at hand to be bold and bring our country into the possibility of a bright green future; it is not a time to sit on our hands and continue to say, ‘We’re so small, our emissions don’t rate against the big economies of China or the USA’, which is a cop-out taken by too many local commenters.

James Shaw making a point

James Shaw making a point


James Shaw then took the floor, and delivered an impressive presentation of the three key policies that the Greens are working on this election, to alleviate the pressures on kiwis that have been exacerbated by the global recession – Addressing Child Poverty in NZ, launched by Metiria Turei in West Auckland, Cleaning up NZ’s Rivers, launched by Dr Russel Norman in Wellington’s Waitangi Park just ten days ago, and a sneak peek at the next policy around energy sustainability, which I won’t go into here because it’s being launched on the 21st September, a mere three weeks away, so look out for the media on that when it happens.
Best one-line of the evening to James – “as Clinton said, ‘It’s the economy, stupid!’, or as Kennedy put it, ‘It’s the stupid economy!'”; which followed on from Dr Graham’s rather sobering facts and figures very well, as the discussion turned to ways of improving both our economy and our sustainability.

Advertisements

Adidas distinguishes between goose and gander

From the Herald this morning:

Meanwhile, Adidas New Zealand’s country manager David Huggett told Radiosport the company was looking to enforce cross-border agreements to stop overseas retailers from selling to New Zealand residents… and we’re certainly taking that very seriously because we want to support New Zealand retailing,” Mr Huggett said.

I’m astonished he can profess his support for New Zealand retailers in the same article which notes his company manufactures all its All Black jerseys offshore at Adidas factories where wages are as low as 60c an hour.

So Adidas has a moral commitment New Zealand retailing, but it would rather those retailers sold entirely overseas manufactured goods, preferably made in factories that would, if based here, breach a swag of New Zealand employment laws.

What a vision for our economy – losing all our manufacturing jobs so that we can sell the same goods we could have made ourselves to each other, all the while supporting a large multinational to exploit minimum employment rights and wages in other countries.

“A Sustainable Economy for New Zealand” Conference

“A Sustainable Economy for New Zealand”
Conference at Legislative Council Chamber, Parliament, Wellington
Friday, 12 November 2010

Sorry about the late notice about this, but it’s been around the internal networks, so excuse me if I just give a brief overview, then I’ll try to report back on how it went.

This has been organised by Dr Russell Norman and Dr Kennedy Graham, with a keynote speech by Dr David Suzuki, as part of his australasian tour.

There are 4 sessions covering Global Sustainability, A Sustainable National Economy (in two parts, Business, agriculture & labour, then Monetary & fiscal policy; Trade & investment policy; & Energy & climate policy) and Political Perceptions of Sustainability. These have panels of speakers including academics, politicians and industry representatives.

Kennedy has blogged about it here on Frogblog.

Edit:

Due to my sloppy energy recovery levels, Kennedy Graham and the Frogblog team have beaten me to a good overall review of the Conference, so I’ll just link to their posts:
Ken’s post is here, and video of Suzuki’s speech is here, credit due to excellent filming by Jackson Wood of the frogblog crew.