Goff – Down with Don in the sewer

Don Brash, 27 January 2004:

Is it to be a modern democratic society, embodying the essential notion of one rule for all in a single nation state?

Or is it the racially divided nation, with two sets of laws, and two standards of citizenship, that the present Labour Government is moving us steadily towards?

Phil Goff, 26 November 2009:

We can choose our future based on principle and with the interests of all New Zealanders at heart.

Or we can have a country where one New Zealander is turned against another, Maori against Pakeha, in a way that Labour strongly rejects.

And both speeches were entitled “Nationhood”.

Now don’t get me wrong. I’m as angry as anyone about the Maori Party’s sellout in supporting watering down the ETS to something that will be completely ineffective.

Goff was right to attack them on that (even though Labour’s ETS would itself have been been only minimally effective in reducing greenhouse gas emissions).

But he didn’t stop there – he’s crawled down into the sewer with Brash by dog-whistling the racist underbelly of society. Disgusting!

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9 thoughts on “Goff – Down with Don in the sewer

  1. You are distorting Goff’s speech in a way that is disgusting, dishonest and far more an example of sewer politics.

    Brash talked about a “government-funded culture of welfare dependency”, a “dangerous drift towards racial separatism in New Zealand.” He said “we find ourselves now, at the beginning of the 21st century, still locked into 19th century arguments.”

    He said “The Treaty did not create a partnership” .

    “We fly Maori elders around the world to lift tapu and expel evil spirits from New Zealand embassies; we allow courts to become entangled in hearings about the risks to taniwha of a new road or building; we refuse to undertake potentially life-saving earthworks on Mount Ruapehu lest we interfere with the spirit of the mountain; and we allow our environment law to be turned into an opportunistic farce by allowing metaphysical and spiritual considerations to be taken into account in the decision process. It is a farce that could all too quickly turn to tragedy.”

    If you are attempting to claim Goff said anything of the sort, you are simply lying.

    How revealing that you cannot find substance to disagree with in Goff’s speech – but instead you make up phony comparison’s to Brash’s overtly racist nonsense.

    When you have to lie and distort to make your point, you don;t have much strength in your argument.

  2. toad,

    That racism is not the underbelly, it is top of mind with a lot of people of non-maori sovereignty persuation.

    Even the Samoan gentleman that comes around and trims my trees is dead set against maori sovereignty. He too, like many others like me, is a racist in that we want equality.

    Now if Maori dont want to have equality that is their problem, not the remaining 83% of society in New Zealand.

    That civil war is getting closer so you better start training.

    Because Honi has given the 83% a perfect reason to take sides. And the 83% is not cut on racial lines, just equal opportunity position.

    Biggest mistake you are making is thinking that the war will be on racial lines, brown versus white, it wont it, will be across those lines where you either want to better New Zealand society or live in a apartheid based Zimbabwe.

  3. @cowpat

    There is nothing dishonest or distorted about my analysis, although I’ll admit to just quoting a couple of paragraphs out of context from each speech – for the sake of keeping the post short – not to distort.

    Here are some more comparisons, courtesy of danyl at The Dim Post

    Brash:

    the topic I will focus on today, is the dangerous drift towards racial separatism in New Zealand, and the development of the now entrenched Treaty grievance industry.

    Goff:

    . . . the government is keeping the grievance going.If you can never settle Treaty grievances, there can never be healing, and you keep alive a grievance from one age into another.

    Brash:

    National is absolutely committed to completing the settlement of historical grievances. We will ensure that the process is accelerated and brought to a conclusion. It must then be wound up

    Goff:

    We must address grievance, but we must not sustain it.

    Brash:

    What we are seeing is the emergence of a population in New Zealand of multi-ethnic heritage – a distinct South Seas race of New Zealanders – where more and more of us will have a diverse ancestry. Hopefully, we will get joy and pride from all the different elements that go to make us who we are.

    Goff:

    There is so much New Zealanders have to be proud of, so much we have to achieve together. We can be proud of the bi-cultural foundation of our nation and the multicultural nature of our community today.

    Brash:

    We will deal with the foreshore issue by legislating to return to the previous status quo . . . Public ownership leaves room for recognising limited customary rights, but we will not allow customary title.

    Goff:

    The government has a choice between sticking with the status quo, which guarantees access but allows for agreements around customary rights, and the alternative of never ending court battles.

    Labour believes in access for all New Zealanders, with respect for custom and heritage.

    Goff’s isn’t as overt as Brash’s but, however much you may want to convince yourself otherwise, it is still racist.

  4. Even the Samoan gentleman that comes around and trims my trees is dead set against maori sovereignty. He too, like many others like me, is a racist in that we want equality.

    While some Maori do want sovereignty, others want what might be better termed “self-determination.” Tino Rangatiratanga is actually kinda difficult to translate, and in many ways it could be interpreted as movement to a more representative and partnership-based democracy. That’s certainly interpretable as democracy. It’s a strawman to suggest that you know the exact percentage of Maori that support outright sovereignty movements without some evidence. I don’t recall it being a terribly significant portion, to be honest, but I won’t claim to know with any accuracy how many people it actually represents. I think outright sovereignty is an extreme and possibly racist position, (in the “small r” sense that it’s not a systematic oppression of a group but rather an expression of attitudes that lead to racial inequality) but I don’t judge Maori as a group by that one viewpoint.

    Goff did not single out the extreme parts of the Tino Rangatiratanga movement. He talked about grievance, which is often a dogwhistle for addressing racial inequality. Inequality is not a “grievance”. Breaking faith with our constitutional law is not a “grievance”. These issues are injustice, plain and simple, and Goff is wrong to dogwhistle otherwise.

    I think it’s also reasonable to point out that our current democracy really hasn’t lived up to the document that justifies it, and there is very real justification for Maori to want a system that delivers results that do not suppress their rights to appease a majority that only thinks it’s not being racist because they wish to apply law that benefits Pakeha to Maori, and call it “equality”. Law that takes away Maori right to determine whether we are honouring the Treaty in court, for instance, is inherently racist.

  5. Ari,

    While it is right and proper that Maori should be able to test their “grievances” in a court of law, the fact that more and more New Zealanders (and not just pakeha) are finding the whole unending process an unfair scenario benefiting the maori elite (with very little trickly down effect bettering the moari people in general).

    Now you can call that racism all you like but it wont change the fact that all the previous “settlements” have done not very much for maori living here in South Auckland.

    Reccomend you have read of Chris Trotters column and comments for a feel of what New Zealanders are thinking.

    http://bowalleyroad.blogspot.com/2009/11/liberal-left-who-needs-you.html

    Maori are going to split into factions where we have the Hone crowd of poor and bypassed maori on one side (possibly arming for “self defence”) while the maori elite keep trying to make the “grievance industry” tick over.

    Yes I know some find the descitption “grievance industry” racist, but that is what 83% of New Zealanders are, “racists”.

    As I said before that racism is not the underbelly, it is top of mind across a large spectrum of New Zealanders.

    The latest sop to allow selected maori iwi to plant forests andc carry out logging operations on crown (DOC?) land is a travesty.

    And the Greens are OK with that?

    Think any of that money will flow down to the maori on the streets of South Auckland? When I look around here (South Auckland) I dont see any evidence of better of maori through any treaty “settlements”.

  6. Gerrit, I think you have a point here (at least to some extent).

    The way I read it, Chris Trotter has a very good class analysis, but he has no Tiriti analysis. He’s right about the Maori elite benefiting from Tiriti settlements, while working class Maori miss out, but he misses the point that Maori are discriminated against in ways other than their being largely working class.

    Tariana Turia, by contrast, has a great Tiriti analysis, but no class analysis. She seems to believe that if elite Maori make gains from Tiriti settlements, it will somehow trickle down to working class Maori. Roger Douglas tried that one 20 years ago (with all of New Zealand, not just Maori) and it miserably failed to raise the socioeconomic status of those worst off. What’s worse, it had the reverse effect.

    Of the mainstream political parties, only the Greens seem to see this is about both class and indigenous peoples’ rights, not one versus the other.

    Oh, and Hone Harawira does too. And that, rather than his rather poor choice of words in what was meant to be a private email, is actually the reason he is on the outer as far as the Parliamentary Maori Party is concerned.

  7. toad,

    That email was never “private” when hone state that he did not care if it went public.

    I think that latest polls clearly indicate that a large portion of New Zealanders see th email for what it is. A racist statement.

    Meanwhile, the poll makes uncomfortable reading for the Maori Party and it’s troubled MP Hone Harawira with 77% saying that Harawira’s abusive email to a party supporter was racist (61% of Maori respondents also thought the email racist) and 69% say that he should leave parliament as a consequence.

    Source

    http://tvnz.co.nz/politics-news/poll-makes-grim-reading-goff-and-harawira-3200388

    So with the majority of the population being racist AND significant parts of maoridom also racist. It proves my point that racism is not in the underbelly of the nation but across the polictical and racial divide.

    I still dont hear a peep from the Greens regarding the forestry and logging deals for selected maori iwi (but not Hone’s iwi – maybe why he is upset?) on crown land.

    Pork belly politics that will not do a thing for working class maori and those maori without iwi representation.

    Not much in any treaty settlements or forestry deals for MUMA (Manukau Urban Maori Authority).

  8. that Maori are discriminated against in ways other than their being largely working class.

    Any examples toad? I had to pay ($3000 per term) to sent my kids through MIT, maori on the same course did not pay a cent (and were disruptive as hell).

    Racist, yes. Oh, I forgot, postive discrimination is OK.

    Well with guilt tripping whites that may wash but with other immigrant groups it is really a sore point.

  9. While it is right and proper that Maori should be able to test their “grievances” in a court of law, the fact that more and more New Zealanders (and not just pakeha) are finding the whole unending process an unfair scenario benefiting the maori elite (with very little trickly down effect bettering the moari people in general).

    I agree with you that some settlements have often simply created a Maori elite, rather than enriching the entire community. This is probably a flaw in the negotiation process rather than an essential flaw in the idea of addressing treaty violations.

    Reccomend you have read of Chris Trotters column and comments for a feel of what New Zealanders are thinking.

    I don’t know whether Goff intended to dogwhistle, so I’m not calling him a racist. I am saying he shouldn’t have done it, and that it will have racist effects.

    Other than that, ewww, don’t make me read Trotter again. He’s sanctimonious and dismissive as usual. Identity politics and economic justice can, and do, mix. I can like the fact that Maori are represented in Parliament while still being disappointed at how friendly to the business elite the Maori Party has been this term. It’s not a contradiction. 😉

    The latest sop to allow selected maori iwi to plant forests andc carry out logging operations on crown (DOC?) land is a travesty.

    And the Greens are OK with that?

    Think any of that money will flow down to the maori on the streets of South Auckland? When I look around here (South Auckland) I dont see any evidence of better of maori through any treaty “settlements”.

    Put simply: No, I’m not. But that doesn’t mean I think the Waitangi Tribunal is a grievance industry. (for a start, it implies that there’s no hard work or spirit of reconciliation going on there, which is simply untrue) I agree that we should be working toward more equitable settlements, and I actually support Goff in the sense that I think it’s a risky precedent to re-open a full and final settlement to adjust for new legislation.

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